Is Your Power of Attorney Right For You?

Is Your Power of Attorney Right For You?

In my opinion, a power of attorney (POA) is a more important document than a will. While a will may control what happens to my family and my possessions when I die; a POA controls what happens to ME while I’m still alive. Because the POA is needed most when I am incapacitated, it’s good to get things right.

Do I have the right POA?

Ohio has two types of POA. The healthcare POA directs who will make your medical decisions when you are unable. The financial POA gives your agent the authority to handle certain financial matters as described in the document. Both documents are important and one cannot substitute for the other.

Have I named the right agents?

The person you choose as your agent will be making important life decisions for you. Consider a person’s character and abilities to handle the duties assigned rather than their proximity to you or birth order. Remember, too, to name one or more backup agents in case your chosen agent is unable to help you when needed.

Did I give my agent the right amount of power?

Your agent can only do those acts specifically described in the document. Thus, if the POA does not say that your agent can open accounts in your name or establish a trust for you he cannot. Similarly, if the POA says that the agent can change the beneficiaries on your life insurance or transfer your house to himself he can.

Is the POA executed in the right way?

A healthcare POA requires a notary or two witnesses to observe and verify the signature. The witnesses cannot be the signer’s physician, medical caregiver or the named agent. Financial POA’s must be notarized if the agents are to be able to deal with real estate in Ohio.

Do the right people have the document?

A POA does no good unless it is used. Be sure that your agent and backup agents know they have been named and what is expected of them. Be sure that they have or know how to locate the document, itself. Although Ohio laws may recognize a photocopy, many financial institutions will demand to see an original before allowing the agent to act.

Powers of Attorney are important to your overall estate plan and should be carefully drafted to fully meet your needs and goals. Consult with your attorney to be sure that your legal documents are right for you!

Advertisements

Comments are closed.