Baby Steps

Baby Steps

If you stopped by to see us in 2016, no doubt you met Dominic, our legal assistant Laura’s son and Williger Legal Group’s resident baby. Dominic has been bringing smiles and fun to our office since March when Laura came back to work. It’s been amazing to watch him grow and even more astounding to see Laura hold him in one arm while typing with the other. But Dominic is now on his feet, hands free to explore, and no longer content to sit and watch.

A new child brings many new responsibilities. One of these responsibilities is making sure the child is protected in the event something happens to the parents. Here are a few tips for young families to consider when creating or updating their estate plan:

Who will raise your child if you can’t?

  • Nominate a guardian for your minor children in your will. Also, name a back-up in case that person is unwilling or unable to serve. The guardian will have legal custody of your child. Choose someone who is willing to take on the responsibility and has a similar child rearing philosophy. Also consider the age, health and location of the guardian as well as his or her stability and family situation.

What will the child’s financial needs will be?

  • Young families should consider life insurance to supplement inheritance and social security death benefits. Level term premiums are usually the least expensive option.
  • Consider using a trust to name someone responsible to manage the money while your child is young. The trustee can use the money for the child’s health, education, maintenance and support. You can designate how you would like the money to be used as well as the age at which the child should receive the money. Some families feel that 25 is a more appropriate age to receive a lump sum than 18.

Do you need to change your beneficiary designations?

  • Not all assets pass by your will or trust. Make sure the beneficiaries named on your life insurance policies, retirement accounts, annuities, and other assets match the intent of your will or trust. If properly titled, your beneficiaries may be able to “stretch” IRA’s to continue to enjoy deferred tax benefits.
  • How would you care for your child if you couldn’t care for yourself?
  • Create Health Care and Financial Powers of Attorney. If you become incapacitated your powers of attorney give your agent the ability to help you with medical decisions and make sure your bills get paid. Without these documents, the only alternative may be a court appointed guardian.

How will your family find information?

  • Keep an Inventory of your assets and key documents as well as contact information for your attorney, doctor, insurance agent, broker, and other trusted advisors. Make it easy for your agent, executor or trustee to determine what you have and what you owe. Don’t forget to include digital assets, and those precious digital photos, keep a master list of accounts, insurance policies, important legal documents and passwords.

How can you make sure the plan will work?

  • Review your plan every year to be sure it is kept up to date. Update your plan as your life changes. Are there any new family members? Is anyone named in the document no longer appropriate to serve in the role you have given them? Has your net worth changed?
  • Consult an attorney. Each state has specific requirements as to how a will and other legal documents must be executed. Be sure that yours comply.
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